Drone Industry Insiders Frustrated by Yet Another Unreliable Drone Sighting Report, This Time at Newark Airport in New Jersey

Drone Industry Insiders Frustrated by Yet Another Unreliable Drone Sighting Report, This Time at Newark Airport in New Jersey

Reports of possible drone sightings temporarily halted flights at Newark Liberty International Airport in New Jersey last week on Tuesday, January 22. However, the reports have yet to be confirmed, and some are suspecting the sightings weren’t drones at all. A United flight lands at Newark Liberty International Airport in New Jersey. The FAA received two reports of possible drone sightings at 3,500 feet near Newark Airport last Tuesday around 4:45 p.m. The first report came from a Southwest pilot and the second from a United pilot. Arriving flights were briefly halted, but normal operations resumed shortly after as no further drone sightings were reported. Was it a Drone at All? Brendan Schulman, DJI Vice President of Policy & Legal Affairs, pointed out on Twitter that the conditions under which the pilots spotted the alleged drones are not credible. Drones are not allowed to fly over 400 feet without permission from the FAA, and most drones do not operate well in temperatures below freezing. Two drones at once. In the dark. At 3500 feet altitude. It’s very cold outside, below freezing; not the kind of weather for flying drones. This is just not credible. https://t.co/nXysfvyRXA — Brendan Schulman (@dronelaws) January 23, 2019 Drone industry insiders are frustrated with the increasing number of reports that drones are shutting down airports with little to no proof that drones were actually involved. Be Cautious When Evaluating Drone Incident Reports From Public Media After the flight delays at Newark Airport, media outlets were quick

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Drone Industry Insiders Frustrated by Yet Another Unreliable Drone Sighting Report, This Time at Newark Airport in New Jersey

Reports of possible drone sightings temporarily halted flights at Newark Liberty International Airport in New Jersey last week on Tuesday, January 22. However, the…

The post Drone Industry Insiders Frustrated by Yet Another Unreliable Drone Sighting Report, This Time at Newark Airport in New Jersey appeared first on UAV Coach.

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Power Company Ameren Successfully Tests BVLOS Inspections in a 60+ Mile Flight

Power Company Ameren Successfully Tests BVLOS Inspections in a 60+ Mile Flight

Ameren, a power company based in St. Louis, MO, has successfully conducted testing of BVLOS (beyond visual line of sight) drone flights to monitor their power lines. The test involved the use of a drone to inspect over 60 miles of lines in a single, non-stop BVLOS flight. Photo credit: Ameren Ameren worked with Black & Veatch and Collins Aerospace to obtain a BVLOS waiver (also known as a 107.31 waiver) from the FAA so that they could conduct this test flight. Thousands of miles of high-voltage power lines lie within the places that Ameren serves, many of them in rural areas. Using their BVLOS waiver, Ameren wanted to see whether inspections done by drone could provide a replacement solution for their current methods of inspecting power lines, which are usually conducted either manually or by helicopter. The result? The test was a big success. Ameren was able to collect high-resolution infrastructure integrity data for all 60 miles of the power lines being inspected, flying a drone BVLOS to conduct the inspection. We are pleased with the outcome of this 60-mile flight. Ultimately, the successful deployment of BVLOS drones could revolutionize how Ameren assesses and evaluates the condition of our systems. – James Pierce, Lead for Ameren’s Central Unmanned Aircraft System Department Given the results of the test, Ameren could potentially conduct routine inspections over a much wider area in a much smaller amount of time—assuming, of course, that they can obtain a permanent FAA waiver for the areas where

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