Drone Presence at Super Bowl LIII Breaks Records and Sets New Precedent for Drone Use at Major Public Events

Drone Presence at Super Bowl LIII Breaks Records and Sets New Precedent for Drone Use at Major Public Events

Drones were present in a variety of forms at Super Bowl LIII in Atlanta, Georgia last week. Tethered quadcopters provided an added layer of security while pre-programmed drones lit up the sky during the halftime show. Present in record-breaking numbers, drones at the NFL championship game set a new precedent for unmanned aerial systems at major public events. Image Source: Intel The Super Bowl provided the drone industry an opportunity to showcase positive uses of drones to protect and even to entertain large gatherings of people. Also, federal officials demonstrated their ability to take down any drones that posed a risk to event attendees. Below, we talk about two drone use cases at the Super Bowl that advanced the industry’s pursuit to make drones regular participants in large-scale, public events and the restrictions put in place to deter any illegal drone operations. Intel Drones Entertain at the Super Bowl LIII Halftime Show Intel Corporation partnered with the NFL to create a live drone light show during the Pepsi Super Bowl LIII Halftime Show. As Maroon 5 began the song “She Will Be Loved,” 150 enhanced Intel Shooting Star drones floated up and over the field in a choreographed performance to the music to form the words “ONE” and “LOVE.” In a historic performance, this was the first live drone light show to ever take place during a Super Bowl halftime show. Intel previously conducted a drone light show for Super Bowl LI in 2017 during Lady Gaga’s halftime performance, but

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Scholar Farms Releases New Masterclass for Rapid Response Drone Data—Learn How to Overcome the “Drone Data Bottleneck”

Scholar Farms Releases New Masterclass for Rapid Response Drone Data—Learn How to Overcome the “Drone Data Bottleneck”

Starting today, a new, online masterclass is available for drone data analysts and organizations wishing to improve their data analysis results, especially in emergency and disaster scenarios. The class, Rapid Response Drone Data, teaches students how to capture and process drone data quickly during an emergency or disaster. The course is available through Scholar Farms and is instructed by Dr. Greg Crutsinger—researcher, academic, certified drone pilot, and founder of the company. Dr. Crutsinger is also a good friend of the UAV Coach team and an alumnus of our Part 107 test prep course, Drone Pilot Ground School. We often vouch for his expertise and the quality of the programs he offers at Scholar Farms. About the Rapid Response Drone Data Masterclass at Scholar Farms Dr. Crutsinger built this latest masterclass to meet the growing needs of agencies and organizations that are adopting drone technology but find it hard to achieve the data results they need during high-pressure situations such as storms, earthquakes, and wildfires. “Anyone who has worked on a drone team during one of these disasters realizes pretty fast that drone hardware and safe piloting are only part of the job. The major bottleneck is in dealing with the huge volume of information being produced,” Dr. Crutsinger explained. You may already have the hardware and flight and safety operations dialed in. The next step is knowing what to do when the drones have landed and the SD cards are full. This is where a lot of teams hit the drone

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Airobotics Receives First-Ever Approval for Automated BVLOS Flights from Australian Civil Aviation Safety Authority

Airobotics Receives First-Ever Approval for Automated BVLOS Flights from Australian Civil Aviation Safety Authority

Airobotics recently announced that they are the recipient of the first approval ever granted by the Australian CASA (Civil Aviation Safety Authority) to fly automated UAV missions BVLOS  (beyond visual line of sight) with no aircrew required on-site. Photo credit: Airobotics According to Airobotics, this new approval gives their remote UAV pilots permission to oversee missions from their Remote Operations Center. Using systems located at customer sites, remote pilots can use this approval to supervise missions at a distance of up to 1,000 kilometers (632 miles) away. Removing aircrews from potentially dangerous environments, like mines, enables customers to extract maximum value and reduce risk from their business operations by leveraging technology and automation. – Niv Russo, Vice President of Aviation and Compliance at Airobotics Comparing Airobotics’ CASA BVLOS Approval to Airobotics’ Recent FAA BVLOS Waiver Last month Airobotics received a BVLOS waiver from the FAA that gave them permission to fly automated BVLOS missions over people without the use of a visual observer. So what’s different between that FAA waiver and the Australian CASA approval they just announced? One main thing stands out—while the FAA waiver gave Airobotics permission to fly BVLOS over people, the CASA approval does not explicitly give Airobotics permission to fly over people. Another difference to note is that Airobotics seems to have permission to fly BVLOS from their ROC (Remote Operations Center) in Australia at a distance of 1,000 kilometers (632 miles) or less from a given site. Airobotics drones can dock at a charging

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How the Pentagon Uses Drones | DoD Domestic Drone Use Reaches All-time High

How the Pentagon Uses Drones | DoD Domestic Drone Use Reaches All-time High

Department of Defense (DoD) drone operations have reached an all-time high in the United States according to new data released by the Pentagon. According to the data, the Pentagon deployed drones domestically more often last year than in the previous five years combined. When prompted to think about drone use by the military, many think about the deployment of armed drones in foreign wars. It’s not often that military drone use is discussed stateside/domestically. However, this new data reveals that military drone use is on the rise here at home in the U.S. But it may not be in the ways you expect. Military Drones Deploy Stateside in Support of Firefighters, Police Officers, Border Patrol, and Other Civilian Authorities The majority of domestic DoD drone operations took place to support civilian authorities, such as firefighters, civilian law enforcement officers, and first-responders. Let’s take a look at the data: DoD UAS Operations in 2018: 4 operations to support firefighters 2 operations to support domestic DoD installations (military bases located in the U.S.) 1 operation to support civil authorities at the southern border 1 operation to support civil authorities in hurricane/flood response 1 operation to support civil law enforcement in counterdrug operations 1 operation to support Public Affairs with an air show within DoD airspace 1 training exercise operation During the 2018 fiscal year, the Pentagon engaged in 11 total domestic drone operations. Some of these operations involved multiple drone flights and took place over several months. The majority of domestic DoD

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