DJI Ryze Tello

Perform flying stunts, shoot quick videos with EZ Shots, and learn about drones with coding education … the Tello can do it all! Whether you’re at a park, in the office, or hanging out at home, you can always take off and experience the world from exciting new perspectives. Tello has two antennas that make video transmission extra stable and a high-capacity battery that offers impressively long flight times. Equipped with a high-quality image processor, Tello shoots incredible photos and videos. Even if you don’t know how to fly, you can record pro-level videos with EZ Shots and share them on social media from your smartphone. Tello lets you record coordinated short videos with Circle, 360, and Up & Away, capture consistently clear images, and preserve your memories with 5MP high-resolution photos. It has a 13-minute flight time. Get your Tello today, starting at $99, here! The post DJI Ryze Tello appeared first on RotorDrone. Perform flying stunts, shoot quick videos with EZ Shots, and learn about drones with coding education … the Tello can do it all! Whether you’re at a park, in the office, or hanging out at home, you can always take off and experience the world from exciting new perspectives. Tello has two antennas that make […] The post DJI Ryze Tello appeared first on RotorDrone. […] Read More

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Autonomous Drone Flight Over Trans-Alaska Pipeline

FOX, Alaska — August 2, 2019 Echodyne, Iris Automation and Skyfront ensure safety of first ever BVLOS flight without human observers conducted by University of Alaska Fairbanks’ UAS IPP team Echodyne, the manufacturer of innovative, high-performance radars for government and commercial markets, announced today that its EchoGuard airspace management radars were the ground-based sensor for the first-ever UAS mission to operate beyond-visual-line-of-sight (BVLOS) flight without ground observers. The ground-based sensors worked in coordination with Iris Automation’s onboard detect-and-avoid system. The demonstration of a nearly four-mile linear inspection mission along the Trans-Alaska pipeline was designed and conducted by The University of Alaska’s Unmanned Aircraft Systems Integration Pilot Program (UASIPP) and the Alyeska Pipeline Service Company and is a true first for the UAS industry. All other BVLOS missions required ground observers, which is too logistically complex and costly for business applications. “Alaska Fairbanks’ team has shown the future of UAS missions for industrial and commercial companies,” said Eben Frankenberg, Echodyne CEO. “There are many applications that require operation beyond the operator’s sight. This practical demonstration of detect-and-avoid technologies for a real-world inspection application helps aviation authorities define the sensors and tools necessary to ensure UAS safety for dozens of industries and applications.” Led by the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) team, the test deployment consisted of Echodyne radars along the pipeline path to provide airspace situational awareness and Iris Automation’s computer vision collision avoidance technology onboard Skyfront’s long-range hybrid multicopter drone. The test was operated by UAF on July 31 and

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Fluidity Tech’s FT Aviator

Fluidity Tech’s FT Aviator

Whatever else there is to say about the FT Aviator from Fluidity Tech, it is bold — even audacious — in the breadth of its vision. While other companies are content to tinker with the placement of a display screen or the layout of an app, Fluidity has dared to fundamentally re-imagine the interface between the pilot and the drone. By now, all professional operators know how to work a two-stick controller with their eyes closed. However, there is no particular reason that should be the default scheme for steering a drone around the sky. It was borrowed from the traditional aeromodeling community, the source of much of the earliest small uncrewed aircraft systems (sUAS) technology — because that’s what was available. However, when Chuck Yeager broke the sound barrier, he did it with his hand wrapped around a single joystick, and so it has been with virtually every noteworthy achievement in aviation going back to the Wright Brothers. Is it really so hard to imagine that single-stick flying might one day be as prevalent among drone pilots as it is among our colleagues who go along for the ride? Consider the Source The FT Aviator is the brainchild of a single man: Scott Parazynski. It is literally true to say that he sees the world differently than the rest of us: specifically, from 250 miles up. Parazynski is an astronaut, who flew twice on board the Space Shuttle, as well as a medical doctor who has climbed to the

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Insurance Coverage 101

The recreational and commercial use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) or drones is expected to increase exponentially over the next decade. Operating UAVs is not without its risks. For example, in one published court decision, Philadelphia Indemnity Ins. Co. v. Hollycal Production, Inc., an aerial photographer who was using a camera-mounted UAV to take wedding photos was sued by a wedding guest who was injured when the vehicle struck her in the face, causing her to lose her sight in one eye. In recognition of this risk, there is a growing interest among UAV operators in acquiring insurance coverage. Indeed, many commercial UAV operators find that their customers expect them to have such insurance. This article presents a brief primer on the availability of insurance products that cover UAV accidents. Coverage under General Liability Policies Most businesses protect themselves against liability to third parties by purchasing commercial general liability (CGL) insurance. Typically, such policies contain “aircraft, auto or watercraft” exclusions, which most likely preclude coverage for injuries caused by UAVs. One such exclusion, for example, eliminates coverage for “bodily injury or property damage arising out of the ownership, maintenance, use or entrustment to others of any aircraft, auto or watercraft owned or operated by or rented or loaned to any insured.” This broadly-worded exclusion would appear to bar coverage for most UAV accidents—provided UAVs fall within the definition of “aircraft.” Although most CGL policies do not define “aircraft,” insurers will no doubt argue that the term is commonly understood to

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Insurance Coverage 101

The recreational and commercial use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) or drones is expected to increase exponentially over the next decade. Operating UAVs is not without its risks. For example, in one published court decision, Philadelphia Indemnity Ins. Co. v. Hollycal Production, Inc., an aerial photographer who was using a camera-mounted UAV to take wedding photos was sued by a wedding guest who was injured when the vehicle struck her in the face, causing her to lose her sight in one eye. In recognition of this risk, there is a growing interest among UAV operators in acquiring insurance coverage. Indeed, many commercial UAV operators find that their customers expect them to have such insurance. This article presents a brief primer on the availability of insurance products that cover UAV accidents. Coverage under General Liability Policies Most businesses protect themselves against liability to third parties by purchasing commercial general liability (CGL) insurance. Typically, such policies contain “aircraft, auto or watercraft” exclusions, which most likely preclude coverage for injuries caused by UAVs. One such exclusion, for example, eliminates coverage for “bodily injury or property damage arising out of the ownership, maintenance, use or entrustment to others of any aircraft, auto or watercraft owned or operated by or rented or loaned to any insured.” This broadly-worded exclusion would appear to bar coverage for most UAV accidents—provided UAVs fall within the definition of “aircraft.” Although most CGL policies do not define “aircraft,” insurers will no doubt argue that the term is commonly understood to

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