Drones Deploy to 911 Calls

Drones Deploy to 911 Calls

A neighborhood in Houston is turning to drones to augment their first responders, with a drone that is deployed to certain events after a 911 call is received. Thanks to a private-public partnership with new startup Paladin Drones, the latest way of responding to certain calls — including home alarms being set off and accidents — is by air and within a matter of seconds. “Now, we can have part of our first responding, in this case a drone, on scene overhead in 15 to 20 seconds,” Police Chief Ray Schultz said. In addition to the faster response time, the drone is also well-equipped and can stream back video in real time. “The software that we built allows any first responders to get a live overhead view of an emergency before they actually arrive,” CEO of Paladin Drones Divyaditya Shrivastava said. The onboard camera is also able to provide help in the dark. “Incidents at night or an incident where there are fire, that thermal camera can actually pick up heat signatures,” Shrivastava said. “(It’s) pretty unique technology,” Mark Kobelan said. Kobelan, the mayor of Piney Point Village, recently had to call police for a possible suspicious person. Within seconds, a drone was overhead. “I think it’s fabulous. It protects the police, and it protects the citizens. If I was a bad guy, I’d be thinking twice about coming to Piney Point Village,” Kobelan said. The post Drones Deploy to 911 Calls appeared first on RotorDrone. A neighborhood in Houston is turning to drones

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Want to Fly a Drone? Everything You Need to Know

The current Part 107 rules that drone pilots need to follow came out in 2016. The FAA made some updates in June 2018 that are included in this review of the requirements to get a drone license for commercial flying.   What Does the FAA Define as the Commercial Use of a Drone? The FAA defines a “commercial purpose” in drone flying as any use of a drone that is done for payment including the receipt of in-kind services. To understand the distinction, a non-commercial use of a drone would be if a person flies a drone to capture images of a resort that they visit while on vacation. If the images are captured for home movies, there is no need for the drone pilot to have a license. A commercial use of a drone occurs, if that same person flies the same drone over the same resort to capture images for a promotional presentation of the resort and is paid for the footage. The payment may be made in cash or by in-kind services, such as receiving a room discount for doing the work. This commercial use of that drone requires a remote pilot’s certificate.   FAA Drone Registration There is an FAA requirement to register drones that are used for either hobby or commercial flying depending on how much the drone weighs. Any drone that weighs more than 8.8 ounces – 0.55 lbs. (250 grams) must be registered with the FAA. Register any drone with the FAA if

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Clyclocopter (aka “Egge Beater Wing”)

When Aerospace giants like Boeing and Airbus reveal some ambitious concept for the future of urban aerial transport, most showcase electrically powered variations on multicopters and hybrid aircraft, sketched out with familiar components like rotors and wings. But the Russian engineers have another idea entirely. Known as a cyclogiro, cyclorotor, cyclocopter, or as some have called it an “egg-beater wing,” this aerial machine is the most exotic and ambitious vision yet. A cyclocopter is driven by cylindrical, rotating wings, each with many small paddles or winglets. The direction of thrust can be changed rapidly by altering the angle of the winglets. The cyclocopter combines vertical take-off and landing with efficient forward flight and good maneuverability. At least, in theory. Russia says its exotic air vehicle will beat anything the West, but many of the nation’s military boasts turn out to be vaporware, so could this crazy-looking contraption actually fly? Russia’s Advanced Research Foundation, a military research organization analogous to the U.S. defense research firm DARPA, carried out a year-long project to find the best configuration to carry 220 to 2,200 pounds, including passengers. They concluded a cyclocopter gives the best aerodynamic performance, so now they’re building one—and they’re not alone. It’s an idea that traces back more than a century into aviation history and is finding a second life with engineers around the world. For the full story from Popular Mechanics, click here. The post Clyclocopter (aka “Egge Beater Wing”) appeared first on RotorDrone. When Aerospace giants like Boeing and Airbus reveal some ambitious concept for the future of urban aerial transport,

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Roof Inspections with Thermal Imaging

This video from our friends at FLIR shares the four things you need to know to get the most out of your roof inspection with thermal imaging! The post Roof Inspections with Thermal Imaging appeared first on RotorDrone. This video from our friends at FLIR shares the four things you need to know to get the most out of your roof inspection with thermal imaging! The post Roof Inspections with Thermal Imaging appeared first on RotorDrone. […] Read More

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Flir’s New Thermal Studio

If you use a Flir thermal imaging device on your sUAV, you’ll want to check out Flir’s new Thermal Studio, a thermal image analysis and reporting software designed to manage large sets of thermal images and videos. Flir Thermal Studio’s advanced processing capabilities and automation are designed to streamline workflow and increase productivity. Flir Thermal Studio offers new measurement functions, advanced formula capability, and custom analysis templates for professional thermographers. Unlike comparable software that requires users to process images individually, this innovative program allows tuning of entire batches of thermal photos or videos with a few clicks. Technicians use Flir Thermal Studio to streamline image processing, which means UAS operators who record thousands of images in a single survey will be able to edit or extract hot spot data quickly and then export it for further analysis. This new software also offers advanced post-processing capabilities so users can gain insights quickly from their data. High-sensitivity mode and pixel-binding for enhanced gas visualization from .SEQ and .CSQ files can help OGI technicians identify gas leaks in motion with video. With advanced measurement functions and coverage calculation, predictive maintenance professionals can generate custom reports quickly — up to 100 pages in less than a minute. Flir Thermal Studio accelerates even the most complex post-production thermal image and video processing, including multi-source plots and formula computations, multi-format export, and Flir’s patented Multi Spectral Dynamic Imaging (MSX®), which superimposes visual light details on thermal images. Supporting more than 20 languages, the program is compatible

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