DJI is hosting its own “Super Sale” to compete with Amazon Prime Day 2019

DJI is hosting its own “Super Sale” to compete with Amazon Prime Day 2019

Everyone else is talking about Amazon Prime Day 2019, but DJI is hosting their own drone sale. The Chinese drone manufacturer behind the Mavic and Phantom drones is hosting their own “Super Sale” on July 15 and 16, where you can save as much as 18% on drones like the Mavic and Tello, as well as non-drone gear like the Osmo. DJI also offers free shipping on all orders over $99. Here are some of the best deals from DJI’s “Super Sale.” The new Osmo Action is $30 off It’s rare for DJI to put such a new product on sale, but the Osmo Action camera, which is essentially DJI’s response to the GoPro, is marked down from $349 to $319. The Osmo Action was launched earlier this year, and there’s some debate as to whether or not it’s a “GoPro killer.” (DJI and GoPro used to operate as partners, with the early Phantoms designed specifically to carry GoPro cameras). The Osmo Action’s dual-screen design includes both the standard 2.25-inch rear touchscreen, plus a 1.4-inch display on the front. The Osmo Pocket is also $30 off The Osmo Pocket is priced identically to the Osmo Action. You’ll save $30 when you buy it through the Super Sale, taking you from $349 to $319. The DJI Osmo Pocket is a teeny, tiny, gimbal camera that shoots 4K footage. I consider it a huge improvement upon the Osmo Mobile, since it uses its own internal camera rather than trying to connect to

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I’m obsessed with how unwieldy DroneII’s 2019 map has become

I’m obsessed with how unwieldy DroneII’s 2019 map has become

Drone Industry Insights, a research group that provides a myriad of reports around the drone industry, released its fourth edition of the Drone Market Environment Map 2019. The map displays and groups companies, organizations, events and associations whose core business is in drones (or they otherwise play an important role in drones). I’m more obsessed than ever with this year’s map (and not just because yours truly, The Drone Girl, is listed in the media, news, blogs and magazines section, alongside some of my good friends including DroneLife, Commercial Drones FM, and Women and Drones. I’m obsessed with this year’s map because of how huge and rather unwieldy (in a good way!) it has become. Here is the Drone Market Environment Map 2019: Courtesy of Drone Industry Insights (click to view the full size) Compare that with 2015’s map, which is significantly smaller. It’s not scientific proof of how the industry has grown (Drone Industry Insights doesn’t claim to track every company out there), but it’s a good high-level glimpse of just how big and broad the drone industry has come. Even when it feels like the drone industry is often consolidating through mergers and acquisitions, or companies are shutting down, this map is proof that that’s not the case. Another infographic, also from Drone Industry Insights, proved just how much investment funding ($702 million) the industry got last year. Here’s 2015’s now very small-looking map: Not only does the 2019 version have significantly more companies listed, but it also

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Everything you need to know about drone delivery startup Flytrex before it heads to the U.S. later this year

Everything you need to know about drone delivery startup Flytrex before it heads to the U.S. later this year

Drone delivery is coming to the small suburb of Holly Springs, North Carolina later this year, said tech startup Flytrex CEO Yariv Bash. The Israel-based drone delivery company is perhaps most well-known for its drone delivery operations in Reykjavik, Iceland. The company has already made deliveries in the U.S. in the past — primarily on a golf course in North Dakota — but Bash says the North Carolina drone flights will be on a much wider scale. The startup Flytrex is one of the companies partnering in the Federal Aviation Administration’s UAS Integration Pilot Program, which selected 10 state, local and tribal governments to test drone flights that are currently not legal without waivers in the U.S. Each of those governments is then partnering with private businesses to conduct various types of drone operations and share their data and learnings with the FAA. Flytrex is working with the North Carolina Department of Transporation to offer on-demand food delivery services from restaurants to homes in nearby suburban areas. Flytrex isn’t the only delivery company working in the program. Matternet and Zipline, two separate companies that conduct deliveries primarily for medical-related purposes, are also working with North Carolina. Other companies participating in North Carolina’s drone test program include Apple, which is using aerial data for Apple maps; Fortem Technologies, which is testing radar on drones, and PrecisionHawk and AirMap, which are studying drone traffic management (often referred to as UTM). An earlier model of Flytrex’s drone carrying AHA products, taken in 2017

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Can you check a drone pilot’s license expiration date?

Can you check a drone pilot’s license expiration date?

Next up in our “Ask Drone Girl” series is about checking a drone pilot’s license expiration date. If you have a question for Drone Girl, contact her here. Does the FAA have an online resource to check the expiration date for a drone pilot? You’re referencing the Federal Aviation Administrations’ Remote Pilot Certificate, which you need in order to operate drones commercially in the U.S. To get one, you must pass the UAS aeronautical knowledge test (many people refer to it as the Part 107 test or Part 107 certificate), since taking the test is mandated in Title 14 CFR Part 107. Upon passing, pilots receive a license, which is good for two years. After two years are up, you’ll need to take a recurrent knowledge test if you wish to continue flying commercially. So is there a place to check when those two years are up? The short answer is “no.” But I’ll elaborate further. The first nuance here, is that your remote pilot certificate never actually expires. It is a life-long certification (unless specifically revoked). Your FAA Remote Pilot Certificate never expires, but… Just like getting other FAA certifications for manned flight, after passing your test you’ll receive a certificate printed on a plastic card, and that card does not have an expiration date. BUT, you cannot legally operate a drone for commercial purposes if two years have lapsed since taking the test (the certificate doesn’t expire, but you cannot operate for life). To continue your operating privileges, you

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Drone deliveries depend on the suburbs, not cities, to succeed

Drone deliveries depend on the suburbs, not cities, to succeed

Don’t expect drone delivery to come to big cities anytime soon. If you live in a suburb, though, you’re in luck. Drone delivery faces almost the opposite challenge that other consumer tech like Uber, bike sharing programs and food delivery face. Those programs are contingent upon a critical mass of people contained in a small area in order to be economically and operationally viable. But for drone delivery, it’s the opposite. In cities, drones have to navigate around complicated landscapes of buildings and trees. There are more people being flown over, thus more inherent danger. There are fewer backyards or open spaces for drones to land in. Suburbs are a dream destination for drone delivery, as drones have big yards to land in, and they can fly lower to the ground without the danger of buildings in the way. When Amazon in 2016 made its first delivery to a customer in the U.K., that customer didn’t live in a bustling city like London. Instead, the drone (carrying a Fire TV and a bag of popcorn) flew 13 minutes and about two miles from an Amazon warehouse to a landing pad placed in a customer’s yard in the English countryside. An early version of Amazon Prime Air’s drone prototype “Population density is lower, so we can fly above open areas,” said Yariv Bash, CEO of drone delivery startup Flytrex. “There are no skyscrapers causing wind gusts.” There’s also a better use-case for drones in suburbs vs. cities. In a city, you

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