Uber is hiring a drone pilot for its food delivery service

Uber is hiring a drone pilot for its food delivery service

How’s this for what could possibly be the coolest job ever? Uber is hiring an FAA-certified drone pilot for a role in its drone team — and the job posting indicates that the role will heavily revolve around using drones for food delivery. Uber posted a job description for a “UAS Flight Standards and Training Technical Program Manager.” The person in that role will “develop standards and the operational manuals needed to enable urban aerial delivery of uberEATS products” and “design training programs for all Uber UAS aviation personnel and ensure compliance with local, state, federal, and international regulations.” Uber is pretty light on “must-haves” with the role, requiring just a bachelor’s degree in a “business-related field,” 3-5 years of work experience. There is one thing you will need: a FAA Part 107 Remote Pilot certificate. The Part 107 Aeronuatical Knowledge Test for UAS operators is a mandatory test under Federal Aviation Administration rules for anyone looking to fly drones commercially. Pass the test, and you’ll get a license, which allows you to operate under the standards set under Part 107. Other nice-to-haves in the job posting include a FAA Private Pilot certificate in either rotorcraft or airplanes, “a unique understanding of aviation operations and economic impacts of decisions,” and expertise in FAA and ICAO regulations. The person filling this role would report to Luke Fischer, Uber’s Head of Flight Operations, and work closely with Mark Moore, Director of Aviation Engineering, Director of Airspace Systems Tom Prevot, and Head of

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This is the most sought-after job in the drone industry right now

This is the most sought-after job in the drone industry right now

Want a job in the drone industry? If you want to get hired, odds are you’re not actually a drone pilot. The most sought-after drone industry job right now: software engineer. That’s according to a February 2019 report from drone analytics firm DRONEII. Their study looked at over 400 companies in the hardware, software and services sectors of the drone industry — ¼ of which had job openings at the time of research. They analyzed 903 job advertisements posted by 102 different companies during the summer of 2018 and found that the most common job opening was for software engineer. It’s not surprising, given the biggest drone news as of late has been around drone-related software. The CEO of French drone company Delair told TheDroneGirl in an interview last month that the company plans to hire about 60 employees this year, and most of the positions will be for software engineers. Other software-based drone companies are making waves, such as Kittyhawk, which recently announced it would be the company responsible for overhauling the Federal Aviation Administration’s B4UFly app. Not only do software engineers have an abundance of job postings to apply for, but they tend to get paid more and are happier than most other workers. An August 2018 Glassdoor report found that software developers and engineering managers are among the highest-paying jobs in America. Among the 10 highest-paying jobs in America, the report found that (based on median base salary), software development managers were the 6th-highest earners based on

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This drone company CEO doesn’t want you to think they’re in the drone business

“We don’t say we’re in the drone business.” That’s what Delair CEO Michael de Lagarde told me when we met for coffee during a quick trip he had made from his home in France to San Francisco. “We are in the physical asset management business.” That’s basically an industry-jargon way of saying, “we are an aerial data management business.” Delair is one of the rising stars in the drone industry as of late. The French drone company has seen rapid growth over the past year with fund raising from Intel in October, the acquisition of Airware in November, and launch of its new delair.ai software platform last month.  And De Lagarde said the company has plans to hire dozens of employees this year. But while De Lagarde is optimistic that the drone industry has plenty of room to grow, something he said caught me as more cautiously optimistic, than simply optimistic. “We are playing for the long run,” he said. “Drones are the means, but they’re not the end game.” And with that, De Lagarde explained that the his company is not putting all of its eggs in the drone basket. “Our platform can ingest drone data, but we can also ingest IoT data or satellite data. It’s complimentary sources of info. Drones are good for small sites and producing high-resolution imagery. Satellite imagery is good for large sites, but produce lower resolution imagery.” Other companies before Delair have been looking to merge the two data sources — drones and satellites — but typically the

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How one photographer earns passive income from drones

How one photographer earns passive income from drones

Meet Missie Ellis, the owner of small business Vantage Point Drone, which does aerial photography for a range of work, from residential to commercial projects like cell tower inspections, construction progressions and roof assessments. Do you know an awesome drone girl I should profile? Contact me here. This interview has been edited for brevity and clarity. Drone Girl:You just started earning passive income from drones. I think that’s any business owner’s dream! How did you earn your first royalty payment? Missie Ellis: Accidentally (with some determination to capture footage of a replica of an Air Force One plane on a tug traveling down the Potomac River)! I was determined to get some footage of the unique sight of a 747 on a tug boat. I researched the name of the tug boat, downloaded the Find a Ship app, tracked it’s progress, and mapped out a good location along the Potomac River in Class G airspace. I was literally bouncing up and down when I spotted the plane on the river. View this post on Instagram Air Force One experience @nationalharbor being tugged by the Island Trader and escorted by Sea Crescent for the Children’s Democracy Project. . . . . #nationalharbor #potomacriver #airforceone #childrensproject #barge #boats #airplanes #vpdrone #nbc #nbcnews #abcnews #cbsnews #weatherchannel #weathernation #cnnnews #foxnews #dc #dcnews #aerial #drone #dronephotography #dronestagram #drones #phantom4pro #ladydroner #uas #dji #djiing @todayshow @fox5dc @nbcwashington @cbsnews @thedroneu A post shared by Vantage Point Drone (@vpdrone) on Sep 30, 2018 at 3:40pm PDT DG: So you

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How drones can teach your kids about science

How drones can teach your kids about science

The following is a guest post by Emily Folk. You can read more of her work on her blog, Conservation Folks. Drones can be a useful tool that science teachers can use to spark interest in various subjects and demonstrate concepts to their students — and it’s not just flying. You hear about STEM, and while drones certainly can teach kids about engineering or computer programming, you can use drones for a variety of science-related lesson plans. Drones are being used for everything from environmental science to animal studies. And even though drones don’t fly more than a few hundred feet off the ground, they’re even a useful tool in astronomy. Here are four ways you can use drones to teach your kids about science: 1.Biology Get outside, and get active, while using a drone to learn about cells. In this lesson plan, you could have students create a large-scale model of a cell structure outside on the school athletic field or in another open area. Once the model is finished, you can fly the drone over the model to get an image of the whole cell. You can use the drone as an analogy for a microscope, flying in closer to zoom in. You can have students build models of different types of cells. To make the activity into a game, you can have students compete to see who can build a model fastest and most accurately. You can fly your drone over the models to find out who

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