This drone can carry a DJI Zenmuse for more than an hour at a time

This drone can carry a DJI Zenmuse for more than an hour at a time

So you want to fly a DJI Zenmuse through the air, but the less-than-30-minutes of flight time on the DJI Inspire 2 won’t cut it? The TerraView RangePro X8 can fly with a Zenmuse on it for more than 70 minutes. That’s on average two and a half times longer than the competition. The new drone, launched this month at the Commercial UAV Expo 2019 in Las Vegas, was built by California-based drone company TerraView. The company claims its new RangePro X8 can fly for more than 70 minutes in real-world conditions with a standard sensor payload.  And the payload is compatible with swappable payload mounts, allowing it to carry multiple sensors, whether it’s one of the Zenmuse cameras, the FLIR Duo Pro or a LIDAR sensor. The drone is designed for industrial, first responder and government enterprise data capture, able to conduct operations like solar panel pipeline or tower inspections, terrain mapping and construction site planning. DJI’s Zenmuse cameras have been enormously popular, but, they were designed by DJI for DJI-created drones with limited flight times. For example, the Zenmuse Z3, DJI’s first integrated aerial zoom camera, is powerful in that it has a 7x zoom. But, of DJI’s drones, it’s compatible with the Inspire 1 (just 18 minutes of flight time), Matrice 600 (36 minutes), and the Matrice 100 (just 40 minutes). So how does the TerraView RangePro X8 fly so long? The company said that higher capacity batteries, coupled with a “highly efficient design” are the secret. The company

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Dedrone’s DroneTracker 4.1 can track and identify your drone in flight

Think you can fly a drone without anyone knowing who is behind the controls? Think again. As drones grow in popularity, so comes the growth of products that can detect the pilots behind them. One of those products is DroneTracker 4.1, a platform designed by San Francisco-based, counter-drone tech company Dedrone. Drone detection technology is generally designed to provide situational awareness of the airspace, giving security teams who don’t want drones in the skies above them an opportunity to get ahead of any potential threat from that drone. And Dedrone’s new DroneTracker 4.1 does exactly that: it’s a software platform that can detect drones. It’s an extension of existing technology by Dedrone, but Dedrone says this version is smarter. Intelligent sensor fusion technology enables PTZ cameras to automatically verify radar detection data. And better technology provides more accurate visual verification of drones in low-light environments through thermal and infrared detection.   It’s capable of recognizing and classify RF, WiFi, and non-WiFi drones. The DroneTracker 4.1 isn’t designed for normal people to buy. Instead, it’s designed for security providers to detect and act upon drone threats.  The software is able to provide airspace activity data, which it then passes onto security providers who can then act how they deem fit based on that data. Here’s how it works: The software program collects data from hardware inputs, including Dedrone’s radio frequency sensors, the RF-100 and RF-300, cameras, radar, and acoustic sensors That data allows it to determine information such as the drone manufacturer, model, time and length of drone activity. Upon

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How much money do drone pilots make?

Fewer than 10% of drone pilots make a living from flying full-time, according to one recent survey, but it’s not all bad news. First off, most drone piloting is a freelance job, meaning you can make it a part-time gig to earn side hustle money on top of a more traditional job. And second, the longer you stick around, the higher your odds of making money. That’s according to the 2019 Drone Industry Survey by UAV Coach, a drone pilot community that also offers online drone training through its Drone Pilot Ground School. They survey gathered responses from 1,389 pilots between April and May 2019. That might be disappointing for pilots looking to get rich off drones, but there’s also something interesting to note that may provide some silver lining. 61% of self-employed drone pilots who responded to they survey had been flying for a year or less, so it’s not surprising that they haven’t had time to build up clients and a portfolio of work. Of the pilots who earned more than $10,000, the vast majority had been flying commercially for at least 1 year and many had been flying for two or more years. Good news though if you prefer working for yourself, not a boss. Most drone pilots are self-employed. 25.8% of respondents said they were self-employed as a pilot, while 25% said they were a self-employed professional augmenting their existing business with drone piloting (such as working as a real estate agent or wedding photographer). But

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249 gram Mavic Mini was designed for safety, DJI says. Sure, but that’s not the whole story.

The $399, 249 gram Mavic Mini launched on Wednesday with one standout feature: an ultra small size. Coming in at 249 grams exactly, that’s 1 gram short of the Federal Aviation Administration’s threshold for when you need to register your drone with the government. Since the drone is under 250 grams, you won’t need to register it in the U.S. or Canada. In some countries, a sub-250g drone may also be able to carry out more ‘complex’ operations that larger drones cannot legally do, such as flying over people. But publicly, DJI says that’s not why they built it so small. DJI publicly won’t say that they built smaller drones to skirt regulation. Not at all. It’s about enhancing safety. More details here:https://t.co/na6tV529c5 — Brendan Schulman (@dronelaws) October 30, 2019 Publicly, DJI will say they built smaller drones for more safety. “In a fall or a collision, a sub-250g drone is just not going to cause the same kind of damage as a heavier drone,” according to a blog post from DJI’s VP of Policy and Legal Affairs, Brendan Schulman. “Every time you fly with a Mavic Mini instead of a heavier drone, you’re flying safer than before – simply by using a lighter product.” That’s all good. Smaller drones are safer. Safer drones are better for everyone. I’m excited about what the Mavic Mini means for the drone industry and for creating a safer environment. The fewer stories of drones crashing and hurting someone, the better. Regulators, industry experts

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DJI Mavic Mini is here: everything you need to know about the tiny new drone

The DJI Mavic Mini is DJI’s tiniest drone yet, weighing in at 249 grams. Yes, that’s less than 250 grams. That means, the new Mavic Mini won’t fall under the purview of the Federal Aviation Administration. The FAA currently only requires drones weighing 250 grams or more to be registered, which means you won’t have to register your Mavic Mini. Canada also requires drones 250 grams or more to be registered. 250 grams is the same as 0.55 lbs, or, in the FAA’s words, the equivalent of two sticks of butter. What’s more: this drone is clearly designed to exempt it from regulations. DJI is also releasing an 199-gram version specific for Japan’s customers, as that complies with Japan’s regulations on micro-UAVs. The smartphone-size is clearly the wow factor on this drone. Otherwise, the specs, like the camera and other safety features are pretty expected, with the camera a step down from DJI’s existing models (of course it’s impressive that they can pack it all into such a tiny drone). The Mavic Mini drone is clearly designed for drone newbies, likely not photographers or other professionals. That makes the Mavic Mini is DJI’s smallest (official) drone yet. DJI has somewhat claimed the 80 gram Tello drone, though it’s officially made by Ryze Technology, just based on DJI equipment. That drone, which costs less than $100, is focused on teaching kids the basics of programming. How the DJI Mavic Mini stacks up in size to other DJI drones: Takeoff Weight Diagonal

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