This is the most popular fixed-wing drone in America

This is the most popular fixed-wing drone in America

It’s probably no surprise that Chinese drone manufacturer DJI dominates the market in multicopters (and more specifically quadcopters, meaning drones with four rotors). But who makes the most popular fixed-wing drone in America? That award goes to senseFly, which makes the eBee fixed-wing drone. The senseFly eBee drone senseFly drones (largely the eBee) accounted for 45% of all new commercial, fixed-wing drone registrations in the United States during the period spanning January through September 2018, according to Federal Aviation Administration Part 107 commercial drone registration data. In that period, registrations of the senseFly eBee are 29% ahead of the next fixed-wing provider on the list. The next most popular dronemaker behind senseFly is Aerovironment. SenseFly was founded in 2009 to develop and produce aerial imaging drones primarily for surveying, agriculture, GIS, industrial inspection, mining and humanitarian aid. The company was acquired by Parrot, maker of the Bebop drone, in 2012 for an undisclosed amount. The company’s eBee drone primarily targets mapping clients, capable of land surveying and topographic mapping to urban planning, crop mapping, thermal mapping and environmental monitoring. Of course, fixed-wing drones account for just a tiny portion of the whole drone industry. While senseFly may have a huge market share of fixed wing drones, their drones represented just a 1% overall market share, according to the 2018 Drone Market Sector Report by Skylogic Research. To put that into perspective, DJI now has an estimated 74% market share. DJI still has the dominant market share. But Gilles Labossière, CEO of senseFly,

Read more...

This guide highlights all the best places to fly drones in the U.S.

This guide highlights all the best places to fly drones in the U.S.

Flying drones is certainly fun, but it can be tough to do. Every new place you fly your drone comes with the concern of “can I legally fly my drone here?” coupled with concerns of whether you can safely do it, whether there will be tons of objects or people nearby to distract from your flying, and whether it’s even a pleasurable place to fly and get great photos. The team at UAV Coach put together an incredible guide to amazing places to fly your drone in over 25 of the most populated cities across the U.S.  Each city has 3-5 recommended spots that are great for flying in. Plus, each city’s page comes with airspace maps and information about local regulations, to ensure you have a seamless flying experienece. Here are some of my personal favorite spots from UAV Coach’s “Where To Fly Your Drone” guide: View this post on Instagram Just some test footage I shot on the @yuneecapv #TyphoonH at one of my favorite places in San Francisco, The Ferry Building! Video unedited and unretouched to show video directly from camera. See a review of the Typhoon on my blog TheDroneGirl.com . . . . . #sanfrancisco #ferrybuilding #bluesky #sf #explore #baybridge #drone #dronesaregood #dronesetc #dronestagram #dronegirl #ameliadronehart #howsfseessf A post shared by Sally French (@thedronegirl) on May 28, 2016 at 8:07am PDT In my current home of San Francisco, Calif: Sue Bierman Park Sue Bierman Park is located across the street from the historic San Francisco Ferry

Read more...

Happy 5th Annual International Drone Day!

Happy 5th Annual International Drone Day!

Coming off the heels of the AUVSI conference in the U.S. and the Western Drone Show in Canada, it’s been a busy week. But today’s the day to cap off a busy year in the drone industry as we celebrate the 5th Annual International Drone Day. International Drone Day was first created back in 2015 by the team of “That Drone Show” as a way to educate the world on the positive ways in which drones are used. The show’s mantra — and the theme of International Drone Day is “Drones are Good!” “That Drone Show” has evolved over the years, but the holiday itself has not only held steady, but grown into a worldwide phenomenon. Drone groups worldwide are hosting their own events separate from the show. One of the biggest events is being held today at Vaughn College in New York, where activities include live drone flights in the hangar, workshops on how to utilize Computer-Aided Design (CAD) to design your own drone, an introduction to the programming language Python on Linux, and a discussion by Drone Girl friend Loretta Alkalay, a New York-based aviation attorney. Every year, That Drone Show hosts their own main event (I had the joy of attending the first-ever event just outside of Las Vegas). This year’s That Drone Show event is being held in El Paso, Texas. El Paso has been designated as the 2019 official host of International Drone Day which will be celebrated by the El Paso Drone Hive at

Read more...

Everything you need to know about drone lobbying groups

Everything you need to know about drone lobbying groups

The following is a guest post by Kennedy Martinez. You can read more of her work on dronethusiast.com With the recent growth in the drone industry — particularly around major drone delivery developments, drone companies are looking to build a future where drones are viewed favorably by the government and the public. Much of those efforts are being led by drone lobbying groups. Here are some of the biggest players in the drone lobby world that you need to know: Non-profit drone lobbying groups AUVSI The Association For Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) claims to be the world’s largest nonprofit organization devoted to advancing the unmanned systems and robotics community, and is one of the most well-known drone lobbying groups out there with a broad following online and even major annual conference. The FAA recently proposed two new regulations around rules for operating small unmanned aircraft over people and for safe and secure small UAS operations. AUVSI says these new proposed rules are overly conservative and too restrictive. AUVSI members have advocated for the FAA to enact a revised framework of its regulations that provide certainty for operators, such as safety compliance based on relevant standards and aircraft reliability. They’ve also urged the FAA to develop new performance-based regulations that better account for the low risk posed by UAS operations. AUVSI membership is open to all types of companies and professionals in the unmanned systems industry as well as university students interested in technology. Anyone can join AUVSI, and standard

Read more...

Want to earn more as a drone pilot? Put your drone photos on Soar

Want to earn more as a drone pilot? Put your drone photos on Soar

If you’re looking to profit from your aerial photography, there’s a new (and pretty easy) way to do it. Australian-based drone & satellite imagery provider Soar is set to launch a drone imagery marketplace this month. But ahead of the launch, Soar is allowing drone operators to upload their images now, so they can start earning money potentially as soon as Soar’s marketplace launches. How to get paid for your photos via Soar’s online marketplace: Soar’s platform lets users share uploads to social media and build a profile, viewable by potential customers and clients. But rather than just sharing drone photos on Facebook where there’s no direct revenue stream, images on Soar are essentially ‘for sale by owner’. You can set price tags on your images, ranging from free to prices that you choose. Soar makes money by taking a 30% cut of the sale price (for context, another stock image site, Getty, takes a 75% cut, so there’s a lot more potential to profit off the same image when sold on Soar). Soar handles the licensing details, and you (the creator) still retain the rights to your photos. Soar’s business development lead Darren Smith said Soar’s product is like a better version of social media. “Members of drone groups on Facebook are putting up amazing images all the time,” Smith said. “Even hobbyists are producing these great images of things like a city skyline, and that should be seen in an advertisement or on the news.” But it’s challenging

Read more...