Emmy-award winning show The List teams up with Drone Girl in intro-to-drones video

Got a drone for Christmas? Just new to drones in general? I partnered with Emmy-award winning show The List to create a new video sharing four important things you need to know before flying a drone. The List is a 30-minute nightly show featuring the latest in pop culture, trends, viral videos and hi-tech. And in their January 9th episode, you’ll find a segment hosted by Segun Oduolowu and featuring me, The Drone Girl, teaching you everything newbies should know about getting started with drones. Watch it here: More than a million drone pilots are expected to take to the skies with a new drone this year, according to the Federal Aviation Administration. This episode goes over basics like: Know the Rules in Your Area: Most countries have their own sets of rules about flying drones. In the U.S., you have to register your drone. If flying for commercial purposes, you have to get a Remote Pilot Certificate, which involves passing a test and getting a license with the FAA. Find Out Where You Can Legally Fly: In the U.S., the FAA has a service called Know Before You Fly which shows a map, making it easy to know if you can legally fly in a certain area. Drones are banned in places like National Parks, and some cities (like my city of San Francisco) have their own separate municipal restrictions around drones. Practice With A Toy Drone: Before getting something more expensive, like a multi-hundred-dollar DJI Mavic, I always

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Interdrone 2020 set to leave Vegas for new conference location

Interdrone 2020 set to leave Vegas for new conference location

It’s the start of a new decade, and with that, the start of a new location for the Interdrone 2020 conference. The annual conference will mark its sixth year by moving to a new city — Dallas, Texas. The past five year of conferences have been held in Las Vegas, Nevada. But in 2020, the International Drone Conference and Exposition will be hosted at the Hyatt Regency, from August 18-20. And according to the organizers, the location won’t be the only major change for InterDrone 2020. Next year’s show is expected to feature new offsite experiences and workshops and co-located industry vertical events as well. Former FAA Administrator Michael Huerta speaks with members of the media after delivering the opening keynote address during the 2016 InterDrone conference. Few details around keynotes, panelists or other events have been announced — after all, it’s still early. But past years have had events including the Women in Drones luncheon, keynotes by top Federal Aviation Administration leadership and more. And Interdrone 2020 is not the only drone event taking place in Texas this year. The 4th Annual Energy Drone & Robotics Summit 2020, put on by the Energy Drone & Robotics Coalition, will be held from June 10-11, 2020 at The Woodlands Waterway Marriott, which is just north of Houston. The 2019 Interdrone show saw about 2,500 attendees and 135 companies. By moving to the middle of the country (or a location that people might already have conference fatigue from, as many drone-related events including

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Women Who Drone explores wildfire relief drones for Australia fire fundraiser

Women Who Drone explores wildfire relief drones for Australia fire fundraiser

The 2020 Australia fire season is one of the worst on record, as more than 15.6 million acres of Australia have burned so far this year. At least 25 people have been killed, 2,000 homes have been destroyed, and an estimated 1 billion animals have been lost. But in bad situations, drones can be used for good. Women Who Drone, which puts on bi-monthly meetups around the world, is turning its attention to the Australia fire disaster. The meetup group (not affiliated with The Drone Girl, but certainly a friend of Drone Girl!) will meet in Mountain View, CA, from 7pm to 9:30pm on January 16th, 2020 at Matternet, a drone delivery company that focuses on delivering medical supplies. The keynote speaker will be Jessie Mooberry, Head of UTM at Airbus, who will discuss ways how drone tech can play a role in preventing bushfires as well as contribute to disaster relief efforts. In the U.S., close to 1,000 state and local police, sheriff, fire and emergency service agencies in the U.S. are known to have been using drones. Firefighters use drones to see through smoke via thermal imaging cameras, to monitor ground crew locations, identify smoldering hot spots and see current fire conditions. And in the aftermath of fires, drone-based aerial imaging can be used to conduct environmental impact studies to assess the fire damage. Veterinarian Angela Scott with PIRSA treats a koala for bushfire burns at the Kangaroo Island Wildlife Park in the Parndana region. The Kangaroo Wildlife Park, owned by Sam Mitchell and partner

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Half of Americans still don’t support drone delivery, study finds

Google loves drone delivery. The Girl Scouts love drone delivery. Heck, even Bono loves drone delivery. But most American’s don’t. A study commissioned by Alexandria, Virginia-based international public affairs firm The Hawthorn Group asked Americans questions around whether they view drones unfavorably or favorably, whether they had safety concerns, and whether they expect drones to actually begin home deliveries on a significant scale. 801 completed telephone interviews later, and they found that 42% of Americans do not think drone delivery is a good idea. And an even higher 49% think delivery drones are too dangerous. But whether or not Americans want them, Americans overwhelmingly expect that they are coming. 70% of Americans said they expect drones to begin home deliveries in the next five to ten years. Here are some of the most interesting results of the study: On accidents related to drone delivery 82% of Americans believe that commercial drones used for small scale and cargo deliveries will cause a serious accident sooner or later (37% strongly believe, and 45% somewhat believe) 68% of Americans are somewhat or extremely concerned about general drone safety 32% of Americans do not believe that drones are safe for commercial use in and over communities and neighborhoods (24% somewhat do not believe, and 8% strongly do not believe) On controlling drones 86.6% of Americans think TSA should have authority to shoot down drones that violate the law by getting too close to airports 93.7% of Americans think law enforcement officials should have the

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DJI Phantom 4 Pro V2.0 back in stock after production hiatus

DJI Phantom 4 Pro V2.0 back in stock after production hiatus

The DJI Phantom 4 Pro V2.0 is back. The popular drone was discontinued in March 2019. At the time, DJI posted a note on its site saying, “The DJI Phantom 4 Pro is no longer in production. For the latest in DJI technology, please view our product recommendations below.” The drone maker was primarily redirecting people to the DJI Mavic 2 Pro instead. But today, DJI sent out a note to customers announcing that the Phantom 4 V Pro V2.0 is back in stock. At the time, the news about DJI discontinuing the Phantom 4 Pro V2.0 drone caused speculation that DJI could introduce a Phantom 5 model. Others speculated that there was no Phantom 5 drone in the immediate pipeline, but rather that DJI was experiencing supplier problems (a tweet from DJI’s Support Twitter account last year indicated that a shortage of parts made it impossible to manufacture more of that specific model). Hi Josh, due to a shortage of parts from a supplier, DJI is unable to manufacture more Phantom 4 Pro V2.0 drones until further notice. We apologize for any inconvenience this might cause. 1/2 — DJI Support (@DJISupport) March 13, 2019 The original Phantom 4 drone launched in March 2016. DJI quickly rolled out the Phantom 4 Pro the same year in November. That drone was a vast improvement upon the already groundbreaking Phantom 4 drone by adding the ability to sense obstacles not only in front, but also behind and on both sides of it.

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