Lightware SF11/C Laser Altimeter and [ultra] Bright Sun

Hi, In December we had a great chance to test the M600 Pro system with a terrain following module in sunny Peru! In general, SF11/C works perfectly. There was one annoying issue: under extremely bright sun over some surfaces it can miss readings for a long time. Fortunately, a solution was found quickly: during the trials we used improvised lens hood. .. from short distance: These altimeters are quite popular in the industry and among DIYers, so be warned if you use them to fly over very low altitudes. Now we use modified holder for standard lens hood for Nicon lenses, but any similar ones should work as well. I must say that Peru is a very interesting place in many ways. Especially the rich history of the Incas and earlier settlers, the ruins and other remains of their civilisation. As one of our hosts put it, “you can dig in any place in Peru and will probably unearth some ancient debris”. A lot of artefacts and skulls were lying just like that in the middle of the desert where we were testing our system.. Safe flights, Alexey Dobrovolskiy http://www.ugcs.com Hi, In December we had a great chance to test the M600 Pro system with a terrain following module in sunny Peru! In general, SF11/C works perfectly. There was one annoying issue: under extremely bright sun over some surfaces it can miss readings for a long time. Fortunately, a solution was found quickly: during t […] Read More

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Is it a rocket? A ducted fan-copter? Both?

I dunno which it is, but it’s really DIY and interesting, and that’s all that counts. From Hackaday: Quadcopters are familiar, and remote control planes are old hat at this point. However, compact lightweight power systems and electronic flight controllers continue to make new flying vehicles possible. In that vein, [rctestflight] has been experimenting with a brushless electric rocket craft, with interesting results. The build uses a single large brushless motor in the tail for primary thrust. Four movable vanes provide thrust vectoring capability. To supplement this control a quadcopter was gutted, and its motors rearranged in the nose of the craft to create a secondary set of thrusters which aid stabilization and maneuverability. The aim is to experiment with a flight regime consisting of vertical takeoff followed by coasting horizontally before returning to a vertical orientation for landing. Preliminary results have been positive, though it was noted that the body of the aircraft is significantly reducing the available thrust from the motors. It’s a creative design which recalls the SpaceX vertical landing rockets of recent times. We’re excited to see where this project leads, and as we’ve seen before – brushless power can make just about anything fly. Even chocolate.Video after the break. I dunno which it is, but it’s really DIY and interesting, and that’s all that counts. From Hackaday: Quadcopters are familiar, and remote control planes are old hat at this point. However, compact lightweight power […] Read More

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Skywalker New Catapult On Sale for Fixed Wings

Skywalker are  launched new catapult for professional mapping survey at the beginning of 2019.      It is really amazing masterpiece at first sight. It looks superb and professional design with aluminum alloy material. It is best choice for taking off fixed wings.      There are some data as belows to take for reference:      Max. launching weight: 4.5kg      Unfolding length: 2.4m      Unfolding height: 0.9m      Folded length: 1.2m Reminder: Portable and easy operation. Operate with attendance of experienced staff. Attention: Forbidden empty launching or launching with total weight under 2kg!  If you have any question, feel free to contact with me. Skype:skywalker-ellen@outlook.com Email: Sales@skywalkermodel.com/skywalker-rc@hotmail.com Skywalker are  launched new catapult for professional mapping survey at the beginning of 2019.      It is really amazing masterpiece at first sight. It looks superb and professional design with aluminum alloy material. It is best choic […] Read More

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Comparing Precision of Autopilots for Survey Missions – The Results

Hi, We’ve reached the final chapter in our series of articles in which we compare the precision of different drone autopilots from various manufacturers. All drones were flown on a typical area scan route created using UgCS flight planning software and compared in terms of how accurately can they stick to survey lines on horizontal and vertical planes. Drones flown in these tests range from hobby-level drones such as Pixhawk with Arducopter firmware and popular consumer-grade drones such as DJI Phantom 4 to more professional drones like the DJI M600 RTK. This list even includes a very expensive drone with Kestrel autopilot that is used in the military and by law enforcement agencies – the Lockheed Martin Indago. Since precision had to be measured numerically, Python scripts were written which compared the .kml file from each flight to the .kml file of the test mission. Only points from straight survey lines were used, points from turns (when transitioning from one survey line to the next) were ignored. Then the closest horizontal and vertical distances from each point in flight were compared to the test route. The table below presents the average and maximum horizontal and vertical deviations. Autopilot / turn type Turn type AVG Horizontal Error MAX Horizontal Error AVG Vertical Error MAX Vertical Error DJI A2 stop and turn 0.62 2.7 0.45 1.71 DJI A2 bank turn 1.61 9 0.44 2.26 DJI A2 adaptive bank turn 1.03 5.13 0.35 1.66 3DR Iris – Pixhawk with PX4 fw straight 0.32

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Air Sciences tests Aeromapper Talon for high resolution terrain mapping in California Desert

Air Sciences Inc. hired GeosUAS Inc, and Aeromao Inc. to demonstrate the Aeromapper Talon’s capabilities for use in high resolution terrain mapping of a windy, dry lake bed in Southern California. Air Sciences is considering the Aeromapper Talon to acquire 3 cm resolution DEMs and orthophotos for around 8 km2 to be acquired on regular intervals.   During the tests, the Talon flew several successful flights of up to 1.5 hrs.  The plane flew and landed successfully when ground level winds were about 15 mph and gusting to 20 mph. Once the images were processed with Pix4D Mapper, the resultant terrain and orthophotos were of high quality, equivalent to data obtained from an industry-grade quadcopter. For Air Sciences, the Aeromapper Talon is particularly attractive because its price is less than half of its competitors.  Consequently, an operational Talon and a second backup system, still cost less than a single plane from other competitors.  As such, the Aeromapper Talon, in addition to being inexpensive can also provide a unique level of operational reliability, still at a reasonable cost. The Aeromapper Talon is a turnkey sUAS manufactured by Canadian company Aeromao Inc. and designed for tasks such as mapping, surveying, precision agriculture, monitoring and surveillance. It is a multipurpose fixed wing drone with a multitude of payload options, including high resolution RGB cameras with PPk, thermal sensors, multispectral cameras and various combinations of these. For more information please visit: https://www.aeromao.com/aeromapper_talon_uav/   About geosUAS, Inc.   Is a United States environmental consulting company which specializes in natural resource assessments for energy, mining, land management

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