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6S4P 22.2V 17Ah 60A Panasonic NCR20700B – CMEC battery pack for UAV

Design, dimensions and technical specifications.

  • Cell count: 24 (same rank cells)
  • Cell type: Li-ion Panasonic NCR20700B 3.6V 4.25Ah 15A
  • DC IR: <20mΩ
  • Series-Parallel-Connected Cells: 6S4P
  • Current capacity: 17Ah (17000 mAh)
  • Voltage (nominal) 22.2V
  • Energy capacity: 377Wh
  • Power: 1332W
  • Maximum continuous discharge current: 60A
  • Maximum pulse discharge current (10sec): 80A
  • Maximum allowable charge voltage: 25.2V
  • The discharge end voltage should be more than: 16.2V (18.6V for long lifespan)
  • Charging current (CC): 8A (for maximum energy storage)
  • Weight: +/- 1560g (3.43lb) – including wiring harnesses, connectors & covering
  • Physical dimensions (distance between cell pack edges, excluding harnesses): 20 x 60 x 7.4 cm / 14.5 x 8.5 x 7.4
  • Gold plated discharge connector (customizable): XT90s / XT150 / EC5 / CASTLE 6.5
  • 10K Thermistor (integrated temperature sensor) with standard JST 2-pin connector (this update come since november 2017)
  • Discharge wire type: Multi-strand 12AWG Flexible Shielded Discharge Cables (EMF Compliance)
  • Discharge wire length (pack to connector end) +/- 100mm
  • Balance plug: JST-XH 7-pin
  • Balance wire length (pack to connector end): +/- 70mm

CMEC - Lithium-ion battery packs for high-performance UAVs

パナソニック Panasonic Sanyo NCR20700B 4.25Ah 15A is the most cost effective battery cell they’ve created the Japanese company. It costs the same like to produce also NCR18650s but offers 30% more power with only like about 5% size increase. Cell dimension: 20,35 x 70,3 mm.

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6S4P 22.2V 17Ah 60A Panasonic NCR20700B – CMEC battery pack for UAV

Design, dimensions and technical specifications.

  • Cell count: 24 (same rank cells)
  • Cell type: Li-ion Panasonic NCR20700B 3.6V 4.25Ah 15A
  • DC IR: <20mΩ
  • Series-Parallel-Connected Cells: 6S4P
  • Current capacity: 17Ah (17000 mAh)
  • Voltage (nominal) 22.2V
  • Energy capacity: 377Wh
  • Power: 1332W
  • Maximum continuous discharge current: 60A
  • Maximum pulse discharge current (10sec): 80A
  • Maximum allowable charge voltage: 25.2V
  • The discharge end voltage should be more than: 16.2V (18.6V for long lifespan)
  • Charging current (CC): 8A (for maximum energy storage)
  • Weight: +/- 1560g (3.43lb) – including wiring harnesses, connectors & covering
  • Physical dimensions (distance between cell pack edges, excluding harnesses): 20 x 60 x 7.4 cm / 14.5 x 8.5 x 7.4
  • Gold plated discharge connector (customizable): XT90s / XT150 / EC5 / CASTLE 6.5
  • 10K Thermistor (integrated temperature sensor) with standard JST 2-pin connector (this update come since november 2017)
  • Discharge wire type: Multi-strand 12AWG Flexible Shielded Discharge Cables (EMF Compliance)
  • Discharge wire length (pack to connector end) +/- 100mm
  • Balance plug: JST-XH 7-pin
  • Balance wire length (pack to connector end): +/- 70mm

CMEC - Lithium-ion battery packs for high-performance UAVs

パナソニック Panasonic Sanyo NCR20700B 4.25Ah 15A is the most cost effective battery cell they’ve created the Japanese company. It costs the same like to produce also NCR18650s but offers 30% more power with only like about 5% size increase. Cell dimension: 20,35 x 70,3 mm.

Read Full Story

Open source underwater glider

I thought people here might be interested in a project that I’ve been working on for a while.

There are no affordable extended duration underwater exploration projects and I’ve developed a hardware platform to provide this capability. The glider uses a mixture of 3D printed components and commodity parts (such as the Blue Robotics tubing/end-caps/serial communication boards). 

The model is viewable on the Onshape online platform here (requires webGL)

The glider is fully open source and assembled using parameterisable 3D prints (to adjust parts for your printer to minimise post processing). Instructions are available, with a level of detail that if you're able to assemble a RepRap kit, you should be able to assemble the glider. The only tools required are a 3D printer, soldering station, dremel and then various hand tools such as hacksaw/allen keys etc. 

With the Onshape CAD model, you are able to duplicate the model and adapt the hardware for your own requirements (such as adding a front mounted camera) - the glider is designed to be a hardware platform for others to use/adapt, not a project with a fixed use case. 

The current software is relatively basic (primarily used to demonstrate the glider ascending/descending underwater), but the control board does have an IMU, allowing for for the addition of a PID algorithm to control glide angle. The control board can also act as a slave board motor controller for the Pixhawk autopilot board and this would integrate with the Mission Planner software in order for the glider to perform autonomous waypoint navigation.

 

More information can be found on the glider's Hackaday page and any comments/suggestions are more than welcome.

 

Read Full Story

Open source underwater glider

I thought people here might be interested in a project that I’ve been working on for a while.

There are no affordable extended duration underwater exploration projects and I’ve developed a hardware platform to provide this capability. The glider uses a mixture of 3D printed components and commodity parts (such as the Blue Robotics tubing/end-caps/serial communication boards). 

The model is viewable on the Onshape online platform here (requires webGL)

The glider is fully open source and assembled using parameterisable 3D prints (to adjust parts for your printer to minimise post processing). Instructions are available, with a level of detail that if you're able to assemble a RepRap kit, you should be able to assemble the glider. The only tools required are a 3D printer, soldering station, dremel and then various hand tools such as hacksaw/allen keys etc. 

With the Onshape CAD model, you are able to duplicate the model and adapt the hardware for your own requirements (such as adding a front mounted camera) - the glider is designed to be a hardware platform for others to use/adapt, not a project with a fixed use case. 

The current software is relatively basic (primarily used to demonstrate the glider ascending/descending underwater), but the control board does have an IMU, allowing for for the addition of a PID algorithm to control glide angle. The control board can also act as a slave board motor controller for the Pixhawk autopilot board and this would integrate with the Mission Planner software in order for the glider to perform autonomous waypoint navigation.

 

More information can be found on the glider's Hackaday page and any comments/suggestions are more than welcome.

 

Read Full Story

EV-PEAK Brand Factory wholesale E5 200W adjust curent 2.0A/3.0A/5.0A 4CH Lipo Battery Balance Charger for 3S 4S drone FPV Lipo battery

EV-PEAK E5 FPV CHARGER

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